Beth Klein Boulder Lawyer's Exploration of Human Powered Things in 2017

floatinggymBehold a human powered gym being powered by a spin class in Paris!

A well-conditioned cyclist can produce about 400 watts of mechanical power for an hour or more, but adults of good average fitness average between 50 and 150 watts for an hour of vigorous exercise.

human-power-powers-power-for-all-humans_hero

Manoj Bhargava has created a human-powered generator.  The generator, called the Free Electric, that can power a rural household running 24 lights and a fan, while charging a phone, for a day, all from an hour’s work by a single individual.

watts can:

Blender/Food Processor (400 Watts) 1 hour/week
Coffee Maker (894 Watts) one hour/day
Dishwasher (1,200 Watts) one hour/day
Microwave Oven (1,450 W) 30 min./day
Freezer 15 Cu. Ft. (341 W.) 12 hrs/day 124
Refrigerator – 14 Cu. Ft. (440 W.) 12 hrs/day

What is a watt anyway?

Electricity usage is calculated in kilowatt-hours. A kilowatt-hour is 1,000 watts used for one hour. As an example, a 100-watt light bulb operating for ten hours would use one kilowatt-hour.

What is on the cutting edge?

Princeton University engineers have developed a device that may change the way that we power many of our smaller gadgets and devices. By using our natural body movement, they have created a small chip that will actually capture and harness that natural energy to create enough energy to power up things such as a cell phone, pacemaker and many other small devices that are electronic.

The chip is a combination of rubber and ceramic nanoribbons. When the chip is flexed, it generates electrical energy. How will this be put to use? Think of rubber soled shoes that have this chip embedded into them and every time a step is taken, energy is created and stored. Just the normal walking around inside the office during a normal work day would be enough to keep that cell phone powered every day.

1-rocking-knit-chair-1

This chair knits you a warm hat! Using the energy generated by simply kicking back and relaxing, the “Rocking-Knit” draws yarn from a spool and knits it into a hat right above your head.

A washing machine, a blender, and a socket.  The later is soccer ball by day and a light all night.

The Pavegen tiles were designed for streets, schools, squares where lots of people walk as it transforms kinetic energy of your steps into electricity. The electricity generated can be used for powering up street lamps, to keep advertisement lamp boxes on, and more.

http://www.crookedbrains.net/

 

Beth Klein suggests – Program a Lego Robot

Lots of people are switching off social media and finding time to gather with friends and explore new ideas.

Here is a suggestion.  Host a “Program a Lego Robot” Party.  You may be surprised at your ability to intuitively program a robot.

This year Lego is selling Boost, a basic robotics- and programming-oriented kit that’s playful.  Boost is built around a motorized block called a Move Hub, powered by six AAA batteries and equipped with a tilt sensor. You can pick from five major building projects: a foot-high anthropomorphic robot called Vernie, a mechanical cat named Frankie; a colorful guitar; a tractor-like vehicle; and the “Autobuilder,” a 3D printer-like machine that can be programmed to put Lego together.

During the construction process, the app introduces new builders to the simple programming interface: a series of puzzle pieces representing different actions, which can be chained together and triggered by a tap of the screen or a real-world action.  You will actually learn just by tinkering with it.

You can program Vernie to dance and shake maracas, to shoot a small projectile at a target, or to hold a conversation using preset lines.  Frankie “plays” a Lego harmonica by detecting when different colors hit the sensor over its mouth, then playing a sound that’s linked to that color, including recorded audio.

Robotics and AI can be understood and a lot of fun.  Have a breakthrough in your relationship with these realms in 2017 with friends.

 

Turkey, ISIS and the PKK.

 

The Kurdish–Turkish conflict is an armed conflict between the Republic of Turkey and various Kurdish insurgent groups that want a separate Kurdish nation or greater rights for Kurds in Turkey.  The main rebel group is the Kurdistan Workers’ Party or PKK (Kurdish: Partiya Karkerên Kurdistan).    The insurgency is mainly in southeastern Turkey and the Kurdish region in Iraq.   What follows is a very simplistic summary of the conflict.

The conflict between the Turks and the Kurds began in 1984.  Former French ambassador to Turkey Eric Rousseau estimated in addition to the 35,000 people killed in military campaigns, 17,500 were assassinated between 1984, when the conflict began, and 1998. An additional 1,000 people were reportedly assassinated in the first nine months of 1999. According to the Turkish press, the authors of these crimes, none of whom have been arrested, belong to groups of mercenaries working either directly or indirectly for the security agencies.

Since the 1970s, the European Court of Human Rights has condemned Turkey for the thousands of human rights abuses against Kurdish people.  The judgments are related to systematic executions of Kurdish civilians, forced recruitments, torturing, forced displacements, thousands of destroyed villages, arbitrary arrests, murdered and disappeared Kurdish journalists. The PKK was responsible for a number of civilian deaths, even though this number is lower than those perpetrated by the government. The number of total civilian deaths perpetrated by the PKK between 1989 and 1999 was determined as 1,205 by the independent Uppsala One-Sided Violence Dataset.

On December 29, 2012, Erdoğan said that the government was conducting negotiations with jailed rebel leader Abdullah Öcalan. Negotiations initially named as Solution Process (Çözüm Süreci).  Assassination of three Kurdish PKK administrators in Paris and the bombings of the Justice Ministry of Turkey and Erdoğan’s office at the Ak Party headquarters in Ankara nearly derailed the peace process.   But despite these attacks on March, 21 2013, a cease-fire that included disarmament and withdrawal from Turkish soil began the conclusion of the 30 year old conflict.

On April 23, 2013, the PKK announced that it would be withdrawing all its forces within Turkey to Northern Iraq.  Constitutional and legal changes towards the recognition of human rights of the Kurds starts simultaneously with withdrawal.

In October 2014, riots erupted in various cities in Turkey after ISIS sieged Kobane. The Kurds accused the Turkish government of supporting ISIS.The conflict between Turkey and PKK escalated following the 2015 Suruç bombing attack on progressive activists, which was blamed on a Turkish ISIL-affiliated group. Turkey bombed alleged PKK bases in Iraq and PYD bases in Syria’s Kurdish region Rojava, effectively ending the cease-fire.

Violence soon spread throughout Turkey. Many Kurdish businesses were destroyed and branches of the pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) were also attacked. There are reports of civilians being killed in several Kurdish-populated towns and villages. In the spring of 2016 the violence increased and in May, a Turkish Bell AH-1 SuperCobra helicopter was shot down by a PKK-fired Russian made MANPADS.

During the winter there is typically a lull in the violence.  But three conditions indicate that in the Spring of 2017 indicate that the violence may increase:  the deadlock in peace talks , polarised antagonists who believe a military solution is possible, and competition over northern Syria in which both sides are seeking maximum outcomes and competing for US support.

After the attempted coup in July 2016, the violence of PKK tactics increased with the use of  improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and kidnapping, assault and killing of political figures.   Ankara has matched the PKK’s ramp up in tactics, convinced that the group could be defeated militarily. “Ankara has declared an ‘all-out war’, intensifying military operations and advancing its domestic crackdown against alleged PKK supporters,” the ICG stated, citing the recent arrests of pro-Kurdish mayors, the closure of Kurdish media outlets, and the arrests of Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) lawmakers.

In 2016, Turkey suffered 18 major terror attacks, most of which were carried out by the PKK, its affiliate group, the Kurdistan Freedom Falcons (TAK), and ISIS.  In addition to its fight against the PKK and ISIS, Turkey has also, simultaneously, put forward a strong fight against the Revolutionary People’s Liberation Party-Front (DHKP-C), as well as the Gülenist Terror Group (FETÖ) which carried out the July 15 coup attempt.

In 2017, the Turkish government is expected to continue its offensive against the PKK locally and in its cross-border operations, which may include an expansion of cross-border operations into northern Iraq, to fight PKK targets, including the Qandil Mountains and Sinjar, in addition to the expansion of Operation Euphrates Shield into areas held by the PKK’s Syrian offshoot, the PYD, in northern Syria.

In his recent speeches, Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu has particularly voiced that 2017 will be the worst year yet for the PKK.

“I say clearly that these are their good days. After April, they will be surprised to see what is happening to them, as their end will come soon. We will decisively continue our fight during the winter,” Interior Minister Soylu said on Dec. 8, during his visit to the eastern Van province.

The PKK, distanced itself on the Reina New Years nightclub attack.  “No Kurdish forces have anything to do with this attack,” it said in a statement. “The Kurdish freedom fight is also the fight for democratization of Turkey. That’s why we won’t target innocent and civilian people.”

ISIS took responsibility for the bombing.

No end is in sight for the armed conflict between these three groups.

 

 

 

Trump’s Stuxnet & Flame Primer

 

bromance-between-trump-and-putin

The romantic idea that war is handled by fleets of ships, planes, and other heavy metal manned by uniformed heroes is becoming part of the past.  Now, a USB stick can be more effective than a bomber.   And we are all part of the new system of war and espionage.  Every electronic device with which we interact provides behavioral data to Google, Facebook,  the NSA and the imaginary 400 pound man in bed in a basement.

It is no secret that Trump has a very limited knowledge of computers – except for his 7th grader mastery of bullying on Twitter.  He says “”I think we ought to get on with our lives. I think that computers have complicated lives very greatly. The whole age of computer has made it where nobody knows exactly what’s going on.”  Actually, people (other than the fake news issue) do know what is going on.  And thus, this writing on Stuxnet and Flame as a rudimentary primer on the sophistication of cyber warfare the day the first power grid was attacked in the US by the Russian Federation.

A code associated with the Russian hacking operation named the Grizzly Steppe by the Obama administration was found in a laptop associated with the system of a Vermont utility, according to U.S. officials.  This discovery occurred after Department of Homeland Security, FBI and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence shared the Grizzly Steppe malware code with executives from 16 sectors nationwide, including the financial, utility and transportation industries. Vermont utility officials identified the code within their operations and reported it to federal officials Friday.  The discovery reveals the vulnerabilities of the nation’s electrical grid. And it raises fears in the U.S. government that Russian government hackers are actively trying to penetrate the grid to carry out potential attacks.  You can read the official paper here.

Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin said ,“Vermonters and all Americans should be both alarmed and outraged that one of the world’s leading thugs, Vladimir Putin, has been attempting to hack our electric grid, which we rely upon to support our quality-of-life, economy, health, and safety,” Shumlin said in a statement. “This episode should highlight the urgent need for our federal government to vigorously pursue and put an end to this sort of Russian meddling.”

Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.) said, “This is beyond hackers having electronic joy rides — this is now about trying to access utilities to potentially manipulate the grid and shut it down in the middle of winter,” Leahy said in a statement. “That is a direct threat to Vermont and we do not take it lightly.”

And it started with Stuxnet.

Stuxnet is a militarized malicious computer worm for which no organization or state has officially admitted responsibility. The worm was at first identified by the security company VirusBlokAda in mid-June 2010.  It is believed to have been used to infect and destroy Iranian uranium production and to render Syrian radar systems unless in Operation Olympic Games during which Syria’s infant nuclear facilities were destroyed by undetected bomber planes.

Anonymous US officials claimed the worm was developed during the Bush administration to sabotage Iran’s nuclear program with what would seem like a compounding accidents over a long period of time and to demoralize the Iranians. In May 2011, the PBS program Need To Know cited a statement by Gary Samore, White House Coordinator for Arms Control and Weapons of Mass Destruction, in which he said, “we’re glad they [the Iranians] are having trouble with their centrifuge machine and that we – the US and its allies – are doing everything we can to make sure that we complicate matters for them”

Stuxnet specifically targets programmable logic controllers (PLCs).  PLCs platform automation of electromechanical processes such as those used to control machinery on factory assembly lines, amusement rides, or centrifuges for separating nuclear material.  It seeks out Siemens Step 7 software through the Microsoft Windows operating system.

Four zero-day flaws were exploited. A zero-day (also known as zero-hour or 0-day or day zero) vulnerability is an undisclosed computer-software vulnerability that hackers can exploit to adversely affect computer programs, data, additional computers or a network.

Stuxnet reportedly compromised Iranian PLCs causing the fast-spinning centrifuges to tear themselves apart.  Stuxnet reportedly ruined almost one fifth of Iran’s nuclear centrifuges.

Stuxnet has three modules: a worm that executes all routines related to the main payload of the attack; a link file that automatically executes the propagated copies of the worm; and a rootkit component responsible for hiding all malicious files and processes, preventing detection of the presence of Stuxnet.

Stuxnet is said to be introduced to the target environment via an infected USB flash drive plugged into a computer.

The worm then propagates across the network, scanning for Siemens Step7 software on computers controlling a PLC. In the absence of either criterion, Stuxnet becomes dormant inside the computer. If both the conditions are fulfilled, Stuxnet introduces the infected rootkit onto the PLC and Step7 software, modifying the codes and giving unexpected commands to the PLC while returning a loop of normal operations system values feedback to the users.

Operation Olympic Games was a covert and still unacknowledged campaign of sabotage by means of cyber disruption, directed at Iranian nuclear facilities by the United States and likely Israel. As reported, it is one of the first known uses of offensive cyber weapons.

Started under the administration of George W. Bush in 2006, Olympic Games was accelerated under President Obama, who heeded Bush’s advice to continue cyber attacks on Iranian nuclear facility at Natanz. Bush believed that the strategy was the only way to prevent an Israeli conventional strike on Iranian nuclear facilities.

Stuxnet has not been useful in North Korea because the computer systems are secured and the ability to introduce even an infected thumb drive is zero.

Stuxnet and cyber warfares’ potential supersede conventional treaty mandated inspections and weapon proliferation.   In cyber warfare, entire power grids, chemical plants and transportations systems can be turned against their own nation of residence.

And now Flame has been detected.  Flame appears to be a new generation of Stuxnet, and when it infects computers, it turns each computer into a bluetooth transmitter of all keystrokes, electronic communications including video chats such as Google hangouts, Skype and Face Chat.  It also has a kill command which wipes all traces of the malware from the computer.

Its discovery was announced on 28 May 2012 by MAHER Center of Iranian National, Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT), Kaspersky Lab[6] and CrySyS Lab of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics.

Flame “is certainly the most sophisticated malware we encountered during our practice; arguably, it is the most complex malware ever found. Flame can spread to other systems over a local network (LAN) or via USB stick. It can record audio, screenshots, keyboard activity and network traffic. The program also records Skype conversations and can turn infected computers into Bluetooth beacons which attempt to download contact information from nearby Bluetooth-enabled devices.”

If all electronic devices that interact with the internet and communications systems are indeed blue tooth transmitters, clearly people know what is “going on” with whom and may be able to predict behavior with the behavioral data mining giants of Facebook and Google.

 

 

Creativity and Boredom.

alma-deutscher

Alma Deutsche gets her musical ideas when she’s about to go to sleep or when she’s waking up, but primarily “by skipping with this skipping rope,” she says.  “I don’t actually skip but I wave it round like this and I tell stories in my mind. Very often a melody just springs into my head. And then I run back and write it down in my notebook,” she says.  “You see it has to be just this kind of skipping rope, with shining tassels and sparkles. Other ropes don’t work at all.”

The child prodigy, who could play the piano at two, the violin at three and could read music before she could read words, swings the rope to help her think up the melodies that have already made her a world-famous composer and performer, and a favourite of musical giants such as Sir Simon Rattle and Daniel Barenboim.

“I used to use sticks but I didn’t want to wave them in someone’s eye,” Alma says. “I’d get into a terrible panic if I couldn’t find the right kind of stick, if it wasn’t ‘swing-ey’ enough.

A skipping rope was much nicer to swing around — I got more melodies and thought of more stories with it. I think it’s to do with the swinging movement and being outside, running around with the wind in my hair.”

Alma does not have a smart phone, a computer, or a TV.  She reads 100 or more books a year, and she composed an opera at age 11 that opens in Vienna today.

On December 29 the full-length version of Cinderella, Alma’s first opera — composed when she was 10 — will have its world premiere in Vienna under the patronage of Zubin Mehta. It follows a chamber version performed by a string quintet without scenery in Israel in July. “This will be at a completely different level, with a full orchestra, costumes and sung in German,” she explains. At the moment she doesn’t speak German and is desperate to learn it, “so I can understand my own opera”.

Her opera protagonist is a Cinderella who is smart and who wrote a song.  The Prince heard and loved the song and searches the kingdom for the girl who can correctly finish the musical phrase he sings.

She considers electronic media a waste of time and that TV ruins the mind.  She also feels that it would interrupt her access to the music in her brain.

Alma is home-schooled. Her father has said that Alma had hoped she would learn to read on her first day at the local school and how frustrated she became. They quickly realised the limitations an ordinary school would impose on her immense gifts, but not just her abilities to play instruments, to sing and to compose.

“I learn here in one hour what would take five hours in school,” she says. She spends each morning practising violin or piano, listening to music or working on her compositions. She writes in notebooks or uses a Sibelius music software programme because it’s faster.

She paints, does ballet or goes to gym classes with other home-schooled children in the afternoons, leaving plenty of time to play, skip and twirl with her rope in the garden — the Deutschers have sensibly invested in bulk supplies of sparkly skipping ropes from Amazon.

Please enjoy her music for a few minutes.

Recently, James Taylor spoke about his need for “empty time.”

Every time I sit down and play, there’s a possibility that a chord change or a chord progression will become a song.

You get in a cage somewhere without any distractions. One of the things I found this time is that I actually need a week of defended empty time before lyrics really start to come through.

t used to be that I could find a place near my home, set up all my notebooks and recorders and my guitar, and work away from three hours before lunch and two hours after lunch, maybe take a long walk. Now I find I actually have to drive a couple of hours away from home and set up camp for a whole week, and after a couple of days, things start to flow.

 

Taylor says that a great deal gets done in “empty time.”

It turns the idea that smart people never get bored on its head.    Maybe we all need some boredom.

 

 

 

 

Beth Klein Boulder Attorney Suggests How to Help Refugees

“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”
― Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays

As America balances on the head of the pin of the future, two camps firmly believe in polar opposite scenarios. And each camp is entrenched in a siloed world view, and the silos must be broken. Over the past year nationalism has vilified terrified Syrians running for their lives and made them virtual human punching bags with a tiny chance of fleeing to the United States. So little truth is known, but red-Americans firmly believe that the United States’ interests are served by shutting out the terrified refugees. Helping refugees and ensuring education and safety is the better path. Beth Klein Boulder’s suggestions on how to get into action instead of just believing are at the bottom of this essay.

About 5 million Syrians have fled since the war began in 2011. The U.S., which took in only about 2,000 refugees in the first several years of the war, has increased the number to about 12,000 this year. The federal resettlement program is administered via nine agencies that depend on the work of volunteers.

More than 4.5 million refugees from Syria are in just five countries Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt:

Turkey hosts 2.5 million refugees from Syria, more than any other country worldwide

Lebanon hosts approximately 1.1 million refugees from Syria which amounts to around one in five people in the country

Jordan hosts approximately 635,324 refugees from Syria, which amounts to about 10% of the population

Iraq where 3.9 million people are already internally displaced hosts 245,022 refugees from Syria

Egypt hosts 117,658 refugees from Syria
The UN’s 2015 humanitarian appeal for Syrian refugees was just 61% funded by the end of the year. Funding shortages mean that the most vulnerable Syrian refugees in Lebanon receive just $21.60 per person month or around US$0.70 cent a day for food assistance, well below the UN’s poverty line of $1.90. 86% of Syrian refugees in urban areas in Jordan are living below the local poverty line.

Selfish memes garner electronic blue thumbs up on Facebook. Then sorrowful memes of pictures of dead children – how did we stand by and watch this happen? Neither are useful to middle class people reduced to nothing and starving. Action matters.

How can we, the privileged and “exceptional”, be debating hope in the face of Aleppo and the Syrian diaspora. How can kind people become so fearful, that they turn away from kindness? When kindness turns away, a violence becomes a reality. Violence becomes the norm birthed from fear and horror.

Sunday, 47 children inside the orphanage near the front line in eastern Aleppo some in “critical condition from injuries and dehydration” were bused out of hell There are many other “vulnerable children” among untold thousands of people still inside eastern Aleppo, according to estimates from the U.N. and humanitarian agencies.

France’s U.N. ambassador , Francois Delattre, urged immediate deployment of U.N. monitors to former rebel-held eastern Aleppo to avoid new atrocities. The goal of the French-Russian compromise resolution adopted Monday is to avoid a repetition of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslims – “to avoid new mass atrocities by the forces on the ground and the militias in particular.”

On Monday buses drove residents toward the western countryside, where aid workers greeted them. Many were exhausted and distressed after a nightmarish journey from an area that U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has described as a “synonym for hell. About 5,000 people have been bused out since midnight, according to the International Committee of the Red Cross, bringing the total number of evacuees to 15,000. Buses are expected to run through the night.

Despite what is said by France, the Russian Federation denies and questions reports of “mass atrocities every day.” But today, solitary men on shoestring budgets can bring superpowers to the knee for a time – with violence and horror.

The UN human rights office said it had reliable evidence that up to 82 civilians were shot on the spot by government and allied forces who entered their homes, or at gunpoint in the streets, over the past few hours.

“The reports that civilians – including children – are being massacred in cold blood in their homes by Syrian government forces are deeply shocking but not unexpected given their conduct to date. Such extrajudicial executions would amount to war crimes,” said Lynn Maalouf, Deputy Director for Research at Amnesty International’s Beirut Regional office.

“Throughout the conflict Syrian government forces, backed by Russia, have repeatedly displayed a callous disregard for international humanitarian law and utter disdain for the fate of civilians. In fact, they have regularly targeted civilians as a strategy, both during military operations and through the mass-scale use of arbitrary detention, disappearances and torture and other ill-treatment. As government forces gain full control of eastern Aleppo the risk that they will commit further atrocities raises grave fears for thousands of civilians still trapped.

Consider:

Donate or Volunteer With the International Rescue Committee

The International Rescue Committee works globally and has been providing critical humanitarian aid to Syrians since 2012. They provide services from cash vouchers for Syrians to purchase food, legal assistance, employment, and education.

The IRC will be providing $100 to 500 of the most vulnerable families fleeing the current situation in Aleppo. While supporting 12 health facilities in Idleb governorate and five schools providing an education for 4,000 children.

In the United States, you can sign up to volunteer at a local resettlement office.

Donate to International Red Cross

The International Red Cross is standing at the ready to help Syrians still trapped in Eastern Aleppo. You can support their efforts to treat the wounded, make sure children are properly fed and cared for, and to get people to safety as quickly as possible by donating.
Work for refugees when they can’t

Double up your support by donating your time and money to refugees. Fear that refugees will take jobs, and lack of economic opportunities for refugees contributes to a difficult environment for refugees to generate income. Combine this with the lengthy time it takes to process work visas for refugees and it can be hard for refugees to feed their families.

This is part of what inspired #WorkforRefugees. A project from World Vision New Zealand where students contributed a portion of their earnings to charities supporting refugees.

You can do this too. Donate a small portion of your effort to show support for refugees and #WorkforRefugees to show your efforts.

Translate for a Syrian refugee

Lend your time in any way you can with the skills and tools you have. If you’re bilingual, especially in Arabic, you have a great opportunity to help. Donate your time by translating for Syrian refugees. Being in a place where you don’t speak the language can be intimidating. Signing up to translate is a great way to help refugees understand their rights and surroundings in a new environment.

Help with legal support

Refugees need help navigating complex laws around immigration status too.A group of law students realized that both could benefit from working together and created an organization that pairs law students and professionals with refugees (15 percent are Syrian) in need of legal assistance. I f you have experience, or are looking to gain experience in the legal field you can join the International Refugee Assistance Project.

Support doctors and medical needs

Doctors without Borders, also known as MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières), provides support in Aleppo, and has doctors working in neighboring countries such as Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey.

Airbnb your apartment or room with refugees

Through Refugees Welcome you can sign up to provide shelter to refugees by renting to them or offering to invite them in and room with them. The organization will even help you pay your rent and cover extra utilities.

If you need further details on how you can help, I am here to help you find a powerful connection. Please leave a comment for Beth Klein Boulder Attorney, and let’s see what we CAN do.

Beth Klein Boulder Attorney suggests ways and reasons to help refugees.

“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”
― Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays

As America balances on the head of the pin of the future, two camps firmly believe in polar opposite scenarios about refugees.  And each camp is entrenched in a siloed world view, and the silos must be broken.

Over the past year nationalism has vilified terrified Syrians running for their lives and made them virtual human punching bags with a tiny chance of fleeing to the United States.   So little truth is known, but red-Americans firmly believe that the United States’ interests are served by shutting out the terrified refugees.  Helping refugees and ensuring education and safety is the better path.  Beth Klein Boulder’s suggestions on how to get into action instead of just believing are at the bottom of this essay.

About 5 million Syrians have fled since the war began in 2011. The U.S., which took in only about 2,000 refugees in the first several years of the war, has increased the number to about 12,000 this year. The federal resettlement program is administered via nine agencies that depend on the work of volunteers.

More than 4.5 million refugees from Syria are in just five countries Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt:

Turkey hosts 2.5 million refugees from Syria, more than any other country worldwide

Lebanon hosts approximately 1.1 million refugees from Syria which amounts to around one in five people in the country

Jordan hosts approximately 635,324 refugees from Syria, which amounts to about 10% of the population

Iraq where 3.9 million people are already internally displaced hosts 245,022 refugees from Syria

Egypt hosts 117,658 refugees from Syria

The UN’s 2015 humanitarian appeal for Syrian refugees was just 61% funded by the end of the year.  Funding shortages mean that the most vulnerable Syrian refugees in Lebanon receive just $21.60 per person month or around US$0.70 cent a day for food assistance, well below the UN’s poverty line of $1.90.  86% of Syrian refugees in urban areas in Jordan are living below the local poverty line.

Selfish memes garner electronic blue thumbs up on Facebook.  Then sorrowful memes of pictures of dead children – how did we stand by and watch this happen?  Neither are useful to middle class people reduced to nothing and starving.  Action matters.

How can we, the privileged and “exceptional”, be debating hope in the face of Aleppo and the Syrian diaspora.  How can kind people become so fearful, that they turn away from kindness?  When kindness turns away, a violence becomes a reality.  Violence becomes the norm birthed from fear and horror.

Sunday, 47 children inside the orphanage near the front line in eastern Aleppo  some in “critical condition from injuries and dehydration” were bused out of hell There are many other “vulnerable children” among untold thousands of people still inside eastern Aleppo, according to estimates from the U.N. and humanitarian agencies.

France’s U.N. ambassador , Francois Delattre, urged immediate deployment of U.N. monitors to former rebel-held eastern Aleppo to avoid new atrocities. The goal of the French-Russian compromise resolution adopted Monday is to avoid a repetition of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslims – “to avoid new mass atrocities by the forces on the ground and the militias in particular.”

On Monday buses drove residents toward the western countryside, where aid workers greeted them. Many were exhausted and distressed after a nightmarish journey from an area that U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has described as a “synonym for hell.  About 5,000 people have been bused out since midnight, according to the International Committee of the Red Cross, bringing the total number of evacuees to 15,000. Buses are expected to run through the night.

Despite what is said by France, the Russian Federation denies and  questions reports of “mass atrocities every day.”  But today, solitary men on shoestring budgets can bring superpowers to the knee for a time – with violence and horror.

The UN human rights office said it had reliable evidence that up to 82 civilians were shot on the spot by government and allied forces who entered their homes, or at gunpoint in the streets, over the past few hours.

“The reports that civilians – including children – are being massacred in cold blood in their homes by Syrian government forces are deeply shocking but not unexpected given their conduct to date. Such extrajudicial executions would amount to war crimes,” said Lynn Maalouf, Deputy Director for Research at Amnesty International’s Beirut Regional office.

“Throughout the conflict Syrian government forces, backed by Russia, have repeatedly displayed a callous disregard for international humanitarian law and utter disdain for the fate of civilians. In fact, they have regularly targeted civilians as a strategy, both during military operations and through the mass-scale use of arbitrary detention, disappearances and torture and other ill-treatment. As government forces gain full control of eastern Aleppo the risk that they will commit further atrocities raises grave fears for thousands of civilians still trapped.

Consider:

Donate or Volunteer With the International Rescue Committee

The International Rescue Committee works globally and has been providing critical humanitarian aid to Syrians since 2012. They provide services from cash vouchers for Syrians to purchase food, legal assistance, employment, and education.

The IRC will be providing $100 to 500 of the most vulnerable families fleeing the current situation in Aleppo. While supporting 12 health facilities in Idleb governorate and five schools providing an education for 4,000 children.

In the United States, you can sign up to volunteer at a local resettlement office.

Donate to International Red Cross

The International Red Cross is standing at the ready to help Syrians still trapped in Eastern Aleppo. You can support their efforts to treat the wounded, make sure children are properly fed and cared for, and to get people to safety as quickly as possible by donating.

Work for refugees when they can’t

Double up your support by donating your time and money to refugees. Fear that refugees will take jobs, and lack of economic opportunities for refugees contributes to a difficult environment for refugees to generate income. Combine this with the lengthy time it takes to process work visas for refugees and it can be hard for refugees to feed their families.

This is part of what inspired #WorkforRefugees. A project from World Vision New Zealand where students contributed a portion of their earnings to charities supporting refugees.

You can do this too. Donate a small portion of your effort to show support for refugees and #WorkforRefugees to show your efforts.

Translate for a Syrian refugee

Lend your time in any way you can with the skills and tools you have. If you’re bilingual, especially in Arabic, you have a great opportunity to help. Donate your time by translating for Syrian refugees. Being in a place where you don’t speak the language can be intimidating. Signing up to translate is a great way to help refugees understand their rights and surroundings in a new environment.

Help with legal support

Refugees need help navigating complex laws around immigration status too.A group of law students realized that both could benefit from working together and created an organization that pairs law students and professionals with refugees (15 percent are Syrian) in need of legal assistance. I

f you have experience, or are looking to gain experience in the legal field you can join the International Refugee Assistance Project.

Support doctors and medical needs

Doctors without Borders, also known as MSF (Médecins Sans Frontières), provides support in Aleppo, and has doctors working in neighboring countries such as Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey.
Airbnb your apartment or room with refugees

Through Refugees Welcome you can sign up to provide shelter to refugees by renting to them or offering to invite them in and room with them. The organization will even help you pay your rent and cover extra utilities.

If you need further details on how you can help, I am here to help you find a powerful connection.  Please leave a comment for Beth Klein Boulder Attorney, and let’s see what we CAN do.

 

 

 

 

Who are the electors -give them a call.

Here is a list of the Electors and their current position on their vote. I have also included whether they are mandated to vote in a certain way. Consider talking to them and please let me know who you called and the results.

Alabama
Electors: 9, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Perry O. Hooper Jr., Pike Road, At-Large
Grady H. Thornton, Birmingham, At-Large
Frank Burt Jr., Bay Minette, CD1
Will B. Sellers, Montgomery, CD2
James Eldon Wilson, Montgomery, CD3
Tim Wadsworth, Arley, CD4
J. Elbert Peters, Huntsville, CD5
Mary Sue McClurkin, Indian Springs, CD6
Robert A. Cusanelli, Carrollton, CD7

Alaska
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Sean Parnell, Palmer
Jacqueline Tupou, Juneau
Carolyn Leman, Anchorage

Arizona
Electors: 11, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

J. Foster Morgan, Glendale — The youngest elector, at 19.
Walter Begay Jr., Kayenta
Bruce Ash, Tucson – National Committeeman
Sharon Giese, Mesa
James O’Connor, Scottsdale
Jerry Hayden, Scottsdale
Robert Graham, Phoenix – State Party Chairman
Edward Robson, Phoenix
Carole Joyce, Phoenix
Alberto Gutier, Phoenix
Jane Pierpoint Lynch, Phoenix
Arkansas
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Jonathan Barnett
Jonelle Fulmer
Keith Gibson
Tommy Land
John Nabholz
Sharon R. Wright

California
Electors: 55, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Dustin R. Reed, Concord
Javier Gonzalez, San Jose
Shawn E. Terris, Ventura
John M. Ryan, San Rafael
Mark W. Headley, Berkeley
Gail R. Teton-Landis, Santa Barbara
Faith A. Garamendi, Davis
Ana A. Huerta, Bakersfield
Marie S. Torres, Hacienda Heights
Kathleen R. Scott, Lincoln
Donna M. Ireland, Pleasanton
Robert S. Torres, Pomona
Timothy J. Farley, Martinez
Christine T. Kehoe, San Diego
Dorothy N. Vann, Long Beach
Analea J. Patterson, Sacramento
Vinzenz J. Koller, Carmel – Has indicated that he is undecided, currently suing California over law forcing him to vote for Clinton.
David S. Warmuth, Pasadena
Janine V. Bera, Elk Grove
Andrew R. Krakoff, Orinda
Karen D. Waters, Inglewood
Sandra M. Aduna, Laguna Woods
Katherine A. Lyon, Coronado
Shirley N. Weber, San Diego
Saundra G. Andrews, Oakland
John P. MacMurray, La Habra
Denise B. Wells, Victorville
Jane C. Block, Riverside
Sheldon Malchicoff, Westlake Village
Gregory H. Willenborg, Los Angeles
Edward Buck, West Hollywood
Nury Martinez, San Fernando
Laurence S. Zakson, Los Angeles
Francine P. Busby, Cardiff
Gwen Moore, Los Angeles
Laphonza R. Butler, Los Angeles
Cathy A. Morris, Rancho Cucamonga
Benjamin Cardenas, Montebello
Stephen J. Natoli, Visalia
Jacki M. Cisneros, Los Angeles
Mark A. Olbert, San Carlos
Raymond L. Cordova, Garden Grove
Christine Pelosi, San Francisco – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Steven D. Diebert, Fresno
Carmen O. Perez, Long Beach
James A. Donahue, El Cerrito
Celine G. Purcell, Redwood City
Patrick F. Drinan, Escondido
Andres Ramos, Elk Grove
Susan Eggman, Stockton
Olivia A. Reyes-Becerra, Stanford
Eileen Feinstein Mariano, San Francisco
Priscilla G. Richardson, Cathedral City
Natalie P. Fortman, Valencia
Steve J. Spinner, Atherton

Colorado
Electors: 9, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Micheal Baca, Denver
Terry Phillips, Louisville
Mary Beth Corsentino, Pueblo
Jerad Sutton, Greeley; has indicated he will not vote for Hillary Clinton.
Robert Nemanich, Colorado Springs; has indicated he will not vote for Hillary Clinton.
Amy Drayer, Greenwood Village
Ann Knollman, Arvada
Sen. Rollie Heath, Boulder
Hon. Polly Baca, Denver; has indicated she will cast her vote for an alternative Republican candidate.
Connecticut
Electors: 7, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Barbara Gordon, West Hartford
Ellen Nurse, Hartford
Edward Piazza, New Haven
Tyisha Walker, New Haven
Christopher Rosario, Bridgeport
Robert Godfrey, Danbury
Steven Jones, Tolland

Delaware
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Lynn Fuller
Lydia York
Linda Cavanaugh

District of Columbia[
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Anita Bonds – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Jack Evans
Franklin Garcia

Florida
Electors: 29, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Tony Ledbetter
Pam Bondi[
Sharon Day
Ade Aderibigbe
Larry Ahern
Brian Ballard
Kristy Banks
Michael Barnett
Lizbeth Benacquisto
Robin Bernstein
John Browning
Dena DeCamp
Nick DiCeglie
Jeremy Evans
John Falconetti
Peter Feaman
Kat Gates-Skipper
Joe Gruters
Debbie Hannifan
Blaise Ingoglia
Mike Moberley
Susan Moore
Joe Negron
Clint Pate
Ray Rodrigues
Carlos Trujillo
Robert Watkins
Susie Wiles
Christian Ziegler

Georgia
Electors: 16, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Bruce Allen Azevedo
Brian K Burdette
Lott Harris Dill
John David Elliott
James Randolph Evans
Bobbie D. Frantz
Linda D. Herren
Rachel Blackstone Little
Deborah M. McCord
Michael Neil McNeely
Mary L. Padgett
Neil L. Pruitt
Joshua Kirk Shook
Frank B. Strickland
Baoky Nguyen Vu (resigned, will be replaced by alternate)
John B. White

Hawaii
Electors: 4, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Electors
John Bickel
Janice Bond
Marie (Dolly) Strazar
David Mulinix

First Alternates
Kainoa Kaumeheiwa-Rego
Eileen McKee
Michael Golojuch Sr.
Yvonne Lau

Second Alternates
Carolyn Golojuch
Julie Patten
Michele Golojuch
Leo Caries

Idaho
Electors: 4, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Layne Bangerter
Caleb Lakey
Jennifer Locke
Melinda Smyser

Illinois
Electors: 20, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Toni Preckwinkle
Carrie Austin
Silvana Tabares
Jesus “Chuy” Garcia
Pam Cullerton
Nancy Sheperdson
Vera Davis
William Marovitz
Barbara Flynn Currie
John R. Daley
Michelle Mussman
Lauren Beth Gash, Highland Park
Kevin Duffy Blackburn, Joliet
Jerry Costello, Belleville
Carol Ammons, Urbana
Mark Guethle, North Aurora
Flint Taylor, McLeansboro
John Nelson, Rockford
Don Johnston, Rock Island.
Shirley McCombs
Indiana
Electors: 11, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Stephanie Beckley, Jamestown
Daniel Bortner, Bedford
Laura Campbell, Carmel
Jeff Cardwell, Indianapolis
Donald L. Hayes, Jasper
Randall Kirkpatrick, Ligonier
Ethan E. Manning, Peru
Macy Kelly Mitchell, Indianapolis
Edwin J. Simcox, Fishers
Kevin Steen, Muncie
Chuck Williams, Valparaiso

Iowa
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

James Whitmer
Don Kass
Dylan Keller
Alan Braun
Kurt Brown
Polly Granzow
Danielle Massey

Kansas
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Ashley J. McMillan, Concordia, party vice chair.
Helen Van Etten, Topeka, national committeewoman.
Mark Kahrs, Wichita, national committeeman.
Ron Estes, Wichita, Kansas State Treasurer.
Clayton L. Barker, Leawood, party executive director.
Kelly Arnold, Wichita, party chairman.

Kentucky
Electors: 8, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Jim Skaggs
David Disponett
Robert Duncan
Michael Carter
Scott Lasley
Walter Reichert
Mary Singleton
Troy Sheldon

Louisiana
Electors: 8, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Chris Trahan, CD1
Lloyd Harsh, CD2
Charles Buckels, CD3
Louis Avalone, CD4
Kay Katz, CD5
Lennie Rhys, CD6
Garret Monti, At Large
Scott Wilfong, At Large

(1st-alternate) Candy Maness
(2nd-alternate) Jennifer Madsen
(3rd-alternate) Christian Gil
(4th-alternate) Constance Diane Long
(5th-alternate) Verne Breland
(6th-alternate) Glenda Pollard
(At Large-alternate) John Batt
(At Large-alternate) Raymond Griffin

Maine
Electors: 4

Democratic Party
3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

(1st) Diane Denk of Kennebunk
(At Large) David Bright of Dixmont
(At Large) Sam Shapiro of Winslow

Republican Party
1, pledged to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

(2nd) Richard A. Bennett of Oxford
Maryland
Electors: 10, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Lesley Israel
Robert Leonard
Lillian Holmes
Salome Peters
Hagner Mister
Claudia Martin
Courtney Watson – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Karen Britto
Susan Ness
Wayne Rogers

Massachusetts
Electors: 11, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Nazda Alam
Mary Gail Cokkinias
Marie Turley
Dori Dean
Donna Smith
Cheryl Cumings
Marc Pacheco
Curtis Lemay
Jason Palitsch
Paul Yorkis
Parwez Wahid

Michigan
Electors: 16, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

John Haggard
Jack Holmes
Kelly Mitchell
Judy Rapanos
Henry Hatter
Robert Weitt
Wyckham Seelig
Ross Ensign
Michael Banerian
Brian Fairbrother
Ken Crider
Mary Vaughn
Jim Rhoades — Motorcycle lobbyist.
William Rauwerdink
Hank Fuhs
Joseph Guzman

Minnesota
Electors: 10, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Fred Knudson
Roger Gehrke
Marge Hoffa
Raymond Hess
Muhammed Abdurrahman
Betsy O’Berry
Mike Wammer
Mary Murphy
Jules Goldstein
Sherrie Pugh

Mississippi[edit]
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Ann Hebert
Joe F. Sanderson Jr.
Bradley R. White
J. Kelley Williams
William G. Yates Jr.
Wirt Yerler
Missouri[edit]
Electors: 10, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Tim Dreste (1st)
Jan DeWeese (2nd)
Hector Maldonado (3rd)
Sherry Kuttenkuler (4th)
Casey Crawford (5th)
Tom Brown (6th)
Cherry Warren (7th)
Scott Clark (8th)
Al Rotskoff
Susie Johnson

Montana
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Thelma Baker
Nancy Ballance
Dennis Scranton
Vondene Kopetski (alternate)
Becky Stockton (alternate)
Thomas Tuck (alternate)
Nebraska
Electors: 5, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Craig Safranek, Merna
Chuck Conrad, Hastings
John Dinkel, Norfolk
Phil Belin, Omaha
Paul Burger, Kearney
Nevada
Electors: 6

Dayananda Prabhu Rachakonda
Larry Jackson
Joetta Brown
Paul Catha II
Greg Gardella
Teresa Benitez-Thompson
New Hampshire
Electors: 4, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

The only all-female slate of electors, all four of whom are the first Democratic women to hold their elected offices.

Terie Norelli- Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Bev Hollingworth- Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Dudley Dudley- Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Carol Shea-Porter – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
New Jersey
Electors: 14, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Alaa R. Abdelaziz of Paterson
Tahsina Ahmed of Haledon — The first Bangladeshi-American female to hold elected office in the nation
Anthony Cureton of Englewood
Lizette Delgado-Polanco of Ewing
Edward Farmer of Piscataway
Christopher D. James of East Orange
Leroy J. Jones Jr. of East Orange
Retha R. Onitiri of Clarksburg
Marlene Prieto of Secaucus
Ronald G. Rios of Carteret
Hetty M. Rosenstein of South Orange
Kelly Steward Maer of Manasquan
Mary Ann Wardlow of Lawnside
Heriberta Loretta Winters of Williamstown

New Mexico
Electors: 5, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Roxanne Allen, a Democratic ward chairwoman in Albuquerque.
Noyola Padilla Archibeque, chairwoman of the San Miguel Federation of Democratic Women in Las Vegas.
John Padilla, a Bernie Sanders delegate to this year’s Democratic National Convention and a ward chairman in Albuquerque.
Lorraine Spradling, a grassroots organizer in Los Lunas.
E. Paul Torres of Isleta Pueblo.
New York
Electors: 29, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

William J. Clinton
Andrew M. Cuomo
Kathy C. Hochul
Thomas P. DiNapoli
Eric T. Schneiderman
Carl E. Heastie
Andrea Stewart-Cousins
Bill de Blasio
Letitia A. James
Scott M. Stringer
Melissa Mark-Viverito
Byron W. Brown
Christine C. Quinn
Basil A. Smikle, Jr.
Melissa Sklarz
Mario F. Cilento
Rhonda Weingarten
George K. Gresham
Daniel F. Donohue
Stuart H. Appelbaum
Gary S. LaBarbera
Lovely A. Warren
Stephanie A. Miner
Katherine M. Sheehan
Anastasia M. Somoza
Sandra Ung
Ruben Diaz, Jr.
Hazel L. Ingram — The oldest elector, at 93.
Rachel D. Gold
North Carolina
15, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Linda Harper
Charles Staley
Karen Kozel
Martha Jenkins
Celeste Stanley
Donald Webb
Robert Muller
Jennifer Dunbar
Andrea Arterburn
Glenn Pinckney Sr.
Mark Delk
David Speight
Ann Sullivan
Lee Green
David Smuski
North Dakota
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

John Olson
Duane Mutch
Bev Clayburgh
Ohio
Electors: 18, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Marilyn Ashcraft
Curt Braden
Christina Hagan
Lee-Ann Johnson
Ralph King
Alex Triantafilou
Mary Anne Christie
Corey Schottenstein
Jim Dicke II
Cheryl Blakely
Richard Jones
Tom Coyne
Judy Westbrock
Leonard Hubert
Tracey Winbush
James Wert
Brian Schottenstein
Ed Crawford
Oklahoma
Electors: 7, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

David Oldham
Teresa Lyn Turner
Mark Thomas
Bobby Cleveland
Lauree Elizabeth Marshall
Charles W. Potts
George W. Wiland, Jr.

Oregon
Electors: 7, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Frank James Dixon, Portland
Karen A. Packer, Newberg
Austin Folnagy, Klamath Falls
Leon H. Coleman, Aloha
Harry W. “Sam” Sappington III, Albany
Timothy Norman Powers Rowan, Portland
Laura Gillpatrick, Eugene

Pennsylvania
Electors: 20, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Bob Asher
Mary Barket
Robert Bozzuto
Theodore (Ted) Christian
Michael Downing
Margaret Ferraro
Robert Gleason
Christopher Gleason
Joyce Haas
Ash Khare
James McErlane
Elstina Pickett
Patricia Poprik
Andrew Reilly
Carol Sides
Glora “Lee” Snover
Richard Stewart
Lawrence Tabas
Christine Toretti
Carolyn Bunny Welsh
Rhode Island
Electors: 4, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Clay Pell – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Grace Diaz
L. Susan Weiner
Frank J. Montanaro
South Carolina
Electors: 9, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Glenn McCall
Matt Moore
Terry Hardesty
Jim Ulmer
Brenda Bedenbaugh
Bill Conley
Shery Smith
Moye Graham
Jerry Rovner
South Dakota
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Marty Jackley
Dennis Daugaard
Matt Michels
Tennessee
Electors: 11, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Beth Scott Clayton Amos, a State Executive Committee member for the Republican party, member of the Board of the Estate Planning Council of Middle TN, At Large
Joey Jacobs of Brentwood as a statewide delegate (Pres & CEO of Acadia Healthcare), At Large
Jason Mumpower (Bristol), CD1
Susan Mills (Maryville), CD2
Liz Holiway (Harriman), CD3
Lynne Davis (Lascassas), CD4
Tom Lawless (Nashville), CD5
Mike Callahan (Monterey), CD6
Pat Allen (Clarksville), CD7
Shannon Haynes (Alamo), CD8
Drew Daniel (Memphis), CD9
Texas
Electors: 38, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Marty Rhymes
Thomas Moon
Carol Sewell
John E. Harper
Sherrill Lenz
Nicholas Ciggelakis
Will Hickman
Landon Estay
Rex Lamb
Rosemary Edwards
Matt Stringer
Shellie Surles
Melissa Kalka
Sandra Cararas
David Thackston
Robert Bruce
Margie Forster
Scott Mann
Marian K. Stanko
Tina Gibson
Ken Muenzter
Alexander Kim
Virginia Abel
Curtis Nelson
Kenneth Clark
Candace Noble
Fred Farias
John Dillard
Tom Knight
Marian Knowlton
Rex Teter
Stephen Suprun Jr.; (Chris Suprun) wrote in the New York Times that he will not vote for Donald Trump
Jon Jewett
Susan Fischer
Lauren Byers
William Greene
Mary Lou Erben
Arthur Sisneros — Vacated the position in late November 2016,[50] stating “Since I can’t in good conscience vote for Donald Trump, and yet have sinfully made a pledge that I would, the best option I see at this time is to resign my position as an Elector. This will allow the remaining body of Electors to fill my vacancy when they convene on Dec 19 with someone that can vote for Trump. The people will get their vote. They will get their Skittles for dinner. I will sleep well at night knowing I neither gave in to their demands nor caved to my convictions. I will also mourn the loss of our republic.”

Utah
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Cherilyn Eagar
Kris Kimball
Jeremy Jenkins
Peter Greathouse
Chia-Chi Teng
Richard Snelgrove
Vermont
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Peter Shumlin
Martha Allen
Tim Jerman
Virginia
Electors: 13, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Bethany J. Rowland, Chesapeake
Debra Stevens Fitzgearld, Harrisonburg
James Harold Allen Boyd, Culpeper
Jasper L. Hendricks, III, Pamplin
Jeanette C. Sarver, Dublin
K. James O’Connor, Jr., Manassas
Kathy Stewart Shupe, Sterling
Keith A. Scarborough, Woodbridge
Lashrecse D. Aird, Petersburg
Susan Johnson Rowland, Chesapeake
Terry C. Frye, Bristol
Virginia L. Peters, Alexandria
Vivian J. Paige, Norfolk

Washington
Electors: 12, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Elizabeth Caldwell
Dan Carpita
Peter Chiafalo – Undecided voter.
Levi Guerra – Has stated she plans to vote for a Republican “consensus candidate.”
Eric Herde
Joshua Ivey
Esther John
Julie Johnson
Varisha Khan
Chris Porter
Robert Satiacum, Jr. – A member of the Puyallup Tribe. Undecided voter.
Phillip Tyler

West Virginia
Electors: 5, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Ron Foster
Patrick Morrisey
Ann Urling
Mac Warner
Bill Cole
Wisconsin
Electors: 10, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Kim Travis, Williams Bay, CD1
Kim Babler, Madison, CD2
Brian Westrate, Fall Creek, CD3
Brad Courtney, Whitefish Bay, CD4
Kathy Kiernan, Richfield, CD5
Dan Feyen, Fond du Lac, CD6
Jim Miller, Hayward, CD7
Bill Berglund, Sturgeon Bay, CD8
Steve King, Janesville, At Large
Mary Buestrin, River Hills, At Large

Wyoming
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Bonnie Foster
Teresa Richards
Karl Allred

Who are the Electors – Call Them?

Here is a list of the Electors and their current position on their vote.  I have also included whether they are mandated to vote in a certain way.  Consider talking to them.

Alabama
Electors: 9, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Perry O. Hooper Jr., Pike Road, At-Large
Grady H. Thornton, Birmingham, At-Large
Frank Burt Jr., Bay Minette, CD1
Will B. Sellers, Montgomery, CD2
James Eldon Wilson, Montgomery, CD3
Tim Wadsworth, Arley, CD4
J. Elbert Peters, Huntsville, CD5
Mary Sue McClurkin, Indian Springs, CD6
Robert A. Cusanelli, Carrollton, CD7

Alaska
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Sean Parnell, Palmer
Jacqueline Tupou, Juneau
Carolyn Leman, Anchorage

Arizona
Electors: 11, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

J. Foster Morgan, Glendale — The youngest elector, at 19.
Walter Begay Jr., Kayenta
Bruce Ash, Tucson – National Committeeman
Sharon Giese, Mesa
James O’Connor, Scottsdale
Jerry Hayden, Scottsdale
Robert Graham, Phoenix – State Party Chairman
Edward Robson, Phoenix
Carole Joyce, Phoenix
Alberto Gutier, Phoenix
Jane Pierpoint Lynch, Phoenix
Arkansas
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Jonathan Barnett
Jonelle Fulmer
Keith Gibson
Tommy Land
John Nabholz
Sharon R. Wright

California
Electors: 55, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Dustin R. Reed, Concord
Javier Gonzalez, San Jose
Shawn E. Terris, Ventura
John M. Ryan, San Rafael
Mark W. Headley, Berkeley
Gail R. Teton-Landis, Santa Barbara
Faith A. Garamendi, Davis
Ana A. Huerta, Bakersfield
Marie S. Torres, Hacienda Heights
Kathleen R. Scott, Lincoln
Donna M. Ireland, Pleasanton
Robert S. Torres, Pomona
Timothy J. Farley, Martinez
Christine T. Kehoe, San Diego
Dorothy N. Vann, Long Beach
Analea J. Patterson, Sacramento
Vinzenz J. Koller, Carmel – Has indicated that he is undecided, currently suing California over law forcing him to vote for Clinton.
David S. Warmuth, Pasadena
Janine V. Bera, Elk Grove
Andrew R. Krakoff, Orinda
Karen D. Waters, Inglewood
Sandra M. Aduna, Laguna Woods
Katherine A. Lyon, Coronado
Shirley N. Weber, San Diego
Saundra G. Andrews, Oakland
John P. MacMurray, La Habra
Denise B. Wells, Victorville
Jane C. Block, Riverside
Sheldon Malchicoff, Westlake Village
Gregory H. Willenborg, Los Angeles
Edward Buck, West Hollywood
Nury Martinez, San Fernando
Laurence S. Zakson, Los Angeles
Francine P. Busby, Cardiff
Gwen Moore, Los Angeles
Laphonza R. Butler, Los Angeles
Cathy A. Morris, Rancho Cucamonga
Benjamin Cardenas, Montebello
Stephen J. Natoli, Visalia
Jacki M. Cisneros, Los Angeles
Mark A. Olbert, San Carlos
Raymond L. Cordova, Garden Grove
Christine Pelosi, San Francisco – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Steven D. Diebert, Fresno
Carmen O. Perez, Long Beach
James A. Donahue, El Cerrito
Celine G. Purcell, Redwood City
Patrick F. Drinan, Escondido
Andres Ramos, Elk Grove
Susan Eggman, Stockton
Olivia A. Reyes-Becerra, Stanford
Eileen Feinstein Mariano, San Francisco
Priscilla G. Richardson, Cathedral City
Natalie P. Fortman, Valencia
Steve J. Spinner, Atherton

Colorado
Electors: 9, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Micheal Baca, Denver
Terry Phillips, Louisville
Mary Beth Corsentino, Pueblo
Jerad Sutton, Greeley; has indicated he will not vote for Hillary Clinton.
Robert Nemanich, Colorado Springs; has indicated he will not vote for Hillary Clinton.
Amy Drayer, Greenwood Village
Ann Knollman, Arvada
Sen. Rollie Heath, Boulder
Hon. Polly Baca, Denver; has indicated she will cast her vote for an alternative Republican candidate.
Connecticut
Electors: 7, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Barbara Gordon, West Hartford
Ellen Nurse, Hartford
Edward Piazza, New Haven
Tyisha Walker, New Haven
Christopher Rosario, Bridgeport
Robert Godfrey, Danbury
Steven Jones, Tolland

Delaware
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Lynn Fuller
Lydia York
Linda Cavanaugh

District of Columbia[
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Anita Bonds – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Jack Evans
Franklin Garcia

Florida
Electors: 29, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Tony Ledbetter
Pam Bondi[
Sharon Day
Ade Aderibigbe
Larry Ahern
Brian Ballard
Kristy Banks
Michael Barnett
Lizbeth Benacquisto
Robin Bernstein
John Browning
Dena DeCamp
Nick DiCeglie
Jeremy Evans
John Falconetti
Peter Feaman
Kat Gates-Skipper
Joe Gruters
Debbie Hannifan
Blaise Ingoglia
Mike Moberley
Susan Moore
Joe Negron
Clint Pate
Ray Rodrigues
Carlos Trujillo
Robert Watkins
Susie Wiles
Christian Ziegler

Georgia
Electors: 16, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Bruce Allen Azevedo
Brian K Burdette
Lott Harris Dill
John David Elliott
James Randolph Evans
Bobbie D. Frantz
Linda D. Herren
Rachel Blackstone Little
Deborah M. McCord
Michael Neil McNeely
Mary L. Padgett
Neil L. Pruitt
Joshua Kirk Shook
Frank B. Strickland
Baoky Nguyen Vu (resigned, will be replaced by alternate)
John B. White

Hawaii
Electors: 4, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Electors
John Bickel
Janice Bond
Marie (Dolly) Strazar
David Mulinix

First Alternates
Kainoa Kaumeheiwa-Rego
Eileen McKee
Michael Golojuch Sr.
Yvonne Lau

Second Alternates
Carolyn Golojuch
Julie Patten
Michele Golojuch
Leo Caries

Idaho
Electors: 4, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Layne Bangerter
Caleb Lakey
Jennifer Locke
Melinda Smyser

Illinois
Electors: 20, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Toni Preckwinkle
Carrie Austin
Silvana Tabares
Jesus “Chuy” Garcia
Pam Cullerton
Nancy Sheperdson
Vera Davis
William Marovitz
Barbara Flynn Currie
John R. Daley
Michelle Mussman
Lauren Beth Gash, Highland Park
Kevin Duffy Blackburn, Joliet
Jerry Costello, Belleville
Carol Ammons, Urbana
Mark Guethle, North Aurora
Flint Taylor, McLeansboro
John Nelson, Rockford
Don Johnston, Rock Island.
Shirley McCombs
Indiana
Electors: 11, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Stephanie Beckley, Jamestown
Daniel Bortner, Bedford
Laura Campbell, Carmel
Jeff Cardwell, Indianapolis
Donald L. Hayes, Jasper
Randall Kirkpatrick, Ligonier
Ethan E. Manning, Peru
Macy Kelly Mitchell, Indianapolis
Edwin J. Simcox, Fishers
Kevin Steen, Muncie
Chuck Williams, Valparaiso

Iowa
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

James Whitmer
Don Kass
Dylan Keller
Alan Braun
Kurt Brown
Polly Granzow
Danielle Massey

Kansas
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Ashley J. McMillan, Concordia, party vice chair.
Helen Van Etten, Topeka, national committeewoman.
Mark Kahrs, Wichita, national committeeman.
Ron Estes, Wichita, Kansas State Treasurer.
Clayton L. Barker, Leawood, party executive director.
Kelly Arnold, Wichita, party chairman.

Kentucky
Electors: 8, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Jim Skaggs
David Disponett
Robert Duncan
Michael Carter
Scott Lasley
Walter Reichert
Mary Singleton
Troy Sheldon

Louisiana
Electors: 8, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Chris Trahan, CD1
Lloyd Harsh, CD2
Charles Buckels, CD3
Louis Avalone, CD4
Kay Katz, CD5
Lennie Rhys, CD6
Garret Monti, At Large
Scott Wilfong, At Large

(1st-alternate) Candy Maness
(2nd-alternate) Jennifer Madsen
(3rd-alternate) Christian Gil
(4th-alternate) Constance Diane Long
(5th-alternate) Verne Breland
(6th-alternate) Glenda Pollard
(At Large-alternate) John Batt
(At Large-alternate) Raymond Griffin

Maine
Electors: 4

Democratic Party
3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

(1st) Diane Denk of Kennebunk
(At Large) David Bright of Dixmont
(At Large) Sam Shapiro of Winslow

Republican Party
1, pledged to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

(2nd) Richard A. Bennett of Oxford
Maryland
Electors: 10, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Lesley Israel
Robert Leonard
Lillian Holmes
Salome Peters
Hagner Mister
Claudia Martin
Courtney Watson – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Karen Britto
Susan Ness
Wayne Rogers

Massachusetts
Electors: 11, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Nazda Alam
Mary Gail Cokkinias
Marie Turley
Dori Dean
Donna Smith
Cheryl Cumings
Marc Pacheco
Curtis Lemay
Jason Palitsch
Paul Yorkis
Parwez Wahid

Michigan
Electors: 16, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

John Haggard
Jack Holmes
Kelly Mitchell
Judy Rapanos
Henry Hatter
Robert Weitt
Wyckham Seelig
Ross Ensign
Michael Banerian
Brian Fairbrother
Ken Crider
Mary Vaughn
Jim Rhoades — Motorcycle lobbyist.
William Rauwerdink
Hank Fuhs
Joseph Guzman

Minnesota
Electors: 10, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Fred Knudson
Roger Gehrke
Marge Hoffa
Raymond Hess
Muhammed Abdurrahman
Betsy O’Berry
Mike Wammer
Mary Murphy
Jules Goldstein
Sherrie Pugh

Mississippi[edit]
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Ann Hebert
Joe F. Sanderson Jr.
Bradley R. White
J. Kelley Williams
William G. Yates Jr.
Wirt Yerler
Missouri[edit]
Electors: 10, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Tim Dreste (1st)
Jan DeWeese (2nd)
Hector Maldonado (3rd)
Sherry Kuttenkuler (4th)
Casey Crawford (5th)
Tom Brown (6th)
Cherry Warren (7th)
Scott Clark (8th)
Al Rotskoff
Susie Johnson

Montana
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Thelma Baker
Nancy Ballance
Dennis Scranton
Vondene Kopetski (alternate)
Becky Stockton (alternate)
Thomas Tuck (alternate)
Nebraska
Electors: 5, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Craig Safranek, Merna
Chuck Conrad, Hastings
John Dinkel, Norfolk
Phil Belin, Omaha
Paul Burger, Kearney
Nevada
Electors: 6

Dayananda Prabhu Rachakonda
Larry Jackson
Joetta Brown
Paul Catha II
Greg Gardella
Teresa Benitez-Thompson
New Hampshire
Electors: 4, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

The only all-female slate of electors, all four of whom are the first Democratic women to hold their elected offices.

Terie Norelli- Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Bev Hollingworth- Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Dudley Dudley- Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Carol Shea-Porter – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
New Jersey
Electors: 14, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Alaa R. Abdelaziz of Paterson
Tahsina Ahmed of Haledon — The first Bangladeshi-American female to hold elected office in the nation
Anthony Cureton of Englewood
Lizette Delgado-Polanco of Ewing
Edward Farmer of Piscataway
Christopher D. James of East Orange
Leroy J. Jones Jr. of East Orange
Retha R. Onitiri of Clarksburg
Marlene Prieto of Secaucus
Ronald G. Rios of Carteret
Hetty M. Rosenstein of South Orange
Kelly Steward Maer of Manasquan
Mary Ann Wardlow of Lawnside
Heriberta Loretta Winters of Williamstown

New Mexico
Electors: 5, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Roxanne Allen, a Democratic ward chairwoman in Albuquerque.
Noyola Padilla Archibeque, chairwoman of the San Miguel Federation of Democratic Women in Las Vegas.
John Padilla, a Bernie Sanders delegate to this year’s Democratic National Convention and a ward chairman in Albuquerque.
Lorraine Spradling, a grassroots organizer in Los Lunas.
E. Paul Torres of Isleta Pueblo.
New York
Electors: 29, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

William J. Clinton
Andrew M. Cuomo
Kathy C. Hochul
Thomas P. DiNapoli
Eric T. Schneiderman
Carl E. Heastie
Andrea Stewart-Cousins
Bill de Blasio
Letitia A. James
Scott M. Stringer
Melissa Mark-Viverito
Byron W. Brown
Christine C. Quinn
Basil A. Smikle, Jr.
Melissa Sklarz
Mario F. Cilento
Rhonda Weingarten
George K. Gresham
Daniel F. Donohue
Stuart H. Appelbaum
Gary S. LaBarbera
Lovely A. Warren
Stephanie A. Miner
Katherine M. Sheehan
Anastasia M. Somoza
Sandra Ung
Ruben Diaz, Jr.
Hazel L. Ingram — The oldest elector, at 93.
Rachel D. Gold
North Carolina
15, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Linda Harper
Charles Staley
Karen Kozel
Martha Jenkins
Celeste Stanley
Donald Webb
Robert Muller
Jennifer Dunbar
Andrea Arterburn
Glenn Pinckney Sr.
Mark Delk
David Speight
Ann Sullivan
Lee Green
David Smuski
North Dakota
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

John Olson
Duane Mutch
Bev Clayburgh
Ohio
Electors: 18, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Marilyn Ashcraft
Curt Braden
Christina Hagan
Lee-Ann Johnson
Ralph King
Alex Triantafilou
Mary Anne Christie
Corey Schottenstein
Jim Dicke II
Cheryl Blakely
Richard Jones
Tom Coyne
Judy Westbrock
Leonard Hubert
Tracey Winbush
James Wert
Brian Schottenstein
Ed Crawford
Oklahoma
Electors: 7, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

David Oldham
Teresa Lyn Turner
Mark Thomas
Bobby Cleveland
Lauree Elizabeth Marshall
Charles W. Potts
George W. Wiland, Jr.

Oregon
Electors: 7, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Frank James Dixon, Portland
Karen A. Packer, Newberg
Austin Folnagy, Klamath Falls
Leon H. Coleman, Aloha
Harry W. “Sam” Sappington III, Albany
Timothy Norman Powers Rowan, Portland
Laura Gillpatrick, Eugene

Pennsylvania
Electors: 20, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Bob Asher
Mary Barket
Robert Bozzuto
Theodore (Ted) Christian
Michael Downing
Margaret Ferraro
Robert Gleason
Christopher Gleason
Joyce Haas
Ash Khare
James McErlane
Elstina Pickett
Patricia Poprik
Andrew Reilly
Carol Sides
Glora “Lee” Snover
Richard Stewart
Lawrence Tabas
Christine Toretti
Carolyn Bunny Welsh
Rhode Island
Electors: 4, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Clay Pell – Signed letter demanding an intelligence briefing on the alleged Russian hacking.
Grace Diaz
L. Susan Weiner
Frank J. Montanaro
South Carolina
Electors: 9, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Glenn McCall
Matt Moore
Terry Hardesty
Jim Ulmer
Brenda Bedenbaugh
Bill Conley
Shery Smith
Moye Graham
Jerry Rovner
South Dakota
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Marty Jackley
Dennis Daugaard
Matt Michels
Tennessee
Electors: 11, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Beth Scott Clayton Amos, a State Executive Committee member for the Republican party, member of the Board of the Estate Planning Council of Middle TN, At Large
Joey Jacobs of Brentwood as a statewide delegate (Pres & CEO of Acadia Healthcare), At Large
Jason Mumpower (Bristol), CD1
Susan Mills (Maryville), CD2
Liz Holiway (Harriman), CD3
Lynne Davis (Lascassas), CD4
Tom Lawless (Nashville), CD5
Mike Callahan (Monterey), CD6
Pat Allen (Clarksville), CD7
Shannon Haynes (Alamo), CD8
Drew Daniel (Memphis), CD9
Texas
Electors: 38, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Marty Rhymes
Thomas Moon
Carol Sewell
John E. Harper
Sherrill Lenz
Nicholas Ciggelakis
Will Hickman
Landon Estay
Rex Lamb
Rosemary Edwards
Matt Stringer
Shellie Surles
Melissa Kalka
Sandra Cararas
David Thackston
Robert Bruce
Margie Forster
Scott Mann
Marian K. Stanko
Tina Gibson
Ken Muenzter
Alexander Kim
Virginia Abel
Curtis Nelson
Kenneth Clark
Candace Noble
Fred Farias
John Dillard
Tom Knight
Marian Knowlton
Rex Teter
Stephen Suprun Jr.; (Chris Suprun) wrote in the New York Times that he will not vote for Donald Trump
Jon Jewett
Susan Fischer
Lauren Byers
William Greene
Mary Lou Erben
Arthur Sisneros — Vacated the position in late November 2016,[50] stating “Since I can’t in good conscience vote for Donald Trump, and yet have sinfully made a pledge that I would, the best option I see at this time is to resign my position as an Elector. This will allow the remaining body of Electors to fill my vacancy when they convene on Dec 19 with someone that can vote for Trump. The people will get their vote. They will get their Skittles for dinner. I will sleep well at night knowing I neither gave in to their demands nor caved to my convictions. I will also mourn the loss of our republic.”

Utah
Electors: 6, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Cherilyn Eagar
Kris Kimball
Jeremy Jenkins
Peter Greathouse
Chia-Chi Teng
Richard Snelgrove
Vermont
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Peter Shumlin
Martha Allen
Tim Jerman
Virginia
Electors: 13, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Bethany J. Rowland, Chesapeake
Debra Stevens Fitzgearld, Harrisonburg
James Harold Allen Boyd, Culpeper
Jasper L. Hendricks, III, Pamplin
Jeanette C. Sarver, Dublin
K. James O’Connor, Jr., Manassas
Kathy Stewart Shupe, Sterling
Keith A. Scarborough, Woodbridge
Lashrecse D. Aird, Petersburg
Susan Johnson Rowland, Chesapeake
Terry C. Frye, Bristol
Virginia L. Peters, Alexandria
Vivian J. Paige, Norfolk

Washington
Electors: 12, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Hillary Clinton for President and Tim Kaine for Vice President

Elizabeth Caldwell
Dan Carpita
Peter Chiafalo – Undecided voter.
Levi Guerra – Has stated she plans to vote for a Republican “consensus candidate.”
Eric Herde
Joshua Ivey
Esther John
Julie Johnson
Varisha Khan
Chris Porter
Robert Satiacum, Jr. – A member of the Puyallup Tribe. Undecided voter.
Phillip Tyler

West Virginia
Electors: 5, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Ron Foster
Patrick Morrisey
Ann Urling
Mac Warner
Bill Cole
Wisconsin
Electors: 10, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Kim Travis, Williams Bay, CD1
Kim Babler, Madison, CD2
Brian Westrate, Fall Creek, CD3
Brad Courtney, Whitefish Bay, CD4
Kathy Kiernan, Richfield, CD5
Dan Feyen, Fond du Lac, CD6
Jim Miller, Hayward, CD7
Bill Berglund, Sturgeon Bay, CD8
Steve King, Janesville, At Large
Mary Buestrin, River Hills, At Large

Wyoming
Electors: 3, pledged but not mandated Federally to vote for Donald Trump for President and Mike Pence for Vice President

Bonnie Foster
Teresa Richards
Karl Allred[

Aleppo has fallen

boy-standing-in-refugee-camp-in-gevgelija-serbia-dsc_8453After years of fighting and an incalculable bloody human toll, insurgents agreed to a ceasefire.  Rebels said fighting would end on Tuesday evening and insurgents and the civilians who have been trapped in Aleppo will leave the city for opposition-held areas of the countryside to the west.

What brought us to this war?

Syrians complained about high unemployment, widespread corruption, a lack of political freedom, and state repression under President Bashar al-Assad, who succeeded his father, Hafez, in 2000.

In March 2011, pro-democracy demonstrations in the Arab Spring movement erupted in the city of Deraa. The government used deadly force to crush the protests, but instead of quashing them, the protests grew nationwide.  Assad’s resignation was demanded.

The government crackdown and the unrest grew.  Opposition supporters began to take up arms,to expel government forces from their towns. Assad vowed to crush “foreign-backed terrorism” and restore state control.The violence rapidly escalated and the country descended into civil war.

The intervention of regional and world powers, including Iran, Russia, Saudi Arabia and the United States escalated the  fighting, and turned Syria into a proxy war zone.

Jihadist groups have also seized on the chaos.  Daisch is battling government forces, rebels and Kurds.

Air strikes by Russia and a US-led multinational coalition intensify the danger.  Russia launched an air campaign in September 2015 with the aim of “stabilising” the government. Moscow stressed that it would target only “terrorists”, but activists said its strikes mainly hit Western-backed rebel groups.  Six months later, having turned the tide of the war in Assad’s favour, Putin ordered the “main part” of Russia’s forces to withdraw, saying their mission had “on the whole” been accomplished.

Shia powerhouse of Iran is spending billions of dollars a year to bolster the Alawite-dominated government, providing military advisers and subsidised weapons, as well as lines of credit and oil transfers. It is also widely reported to have deployed hundreds of combat troops in Syria. Assad is Iran’s closest Arab ally and Syria is the main transit point for Iranian weapons shipments to the Lebanese Shia Islamist movement Hezbollah, which has sent thousands of fighters to support government forces.Sunni-ruled Saudi Arabia, which is seeking to counter Iran, has been a major provider of military and financial assistance to the rebels, including those with Islamist ideologies.

Turkey, a supporter of the rebels, has meanwhile sought to limit US support for Kurdish forces battling IS militants in northern Syria, accusing them of being affiliated to the banned Turkish Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK).

Assad says the US is responsible for widespread atrocities and must step down, has provided only limited military assistance to “moderate” rebels, fearful that advanced weapons might end up in the hands of jihadists. Since September 2014, the US has conducted air strikes on Daisch in Syria, but it has avoided attacking government forces.

The UN says 250,000 people have been killed in the past five years. However, the organisation stopped updating its figures in August 2015. One monitoring group estimates 470,000 deaths,.

More than 4.8 million people have fled Syria, most of them women and children.

Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey have struggled to cope with one of the largest refugee movements  in history.  About 10% of Syrian refugees have sought safety in Europe.  Political divisions and nationalism have risen as countries argue over sharing the human burden. A further 6.5 million people are displaced inside Syria.

As people cross the Mediterranean, hundreds drown every week.  Coyotes and traffickers charge enormous sums to transport terrified men, women and children in unseaworthy boats.

The US has essentially denied entry to these terrified people.  And now we have a new policy called “extreme” vetting.

With the fall of Aleppo, people are being shot as they are running.  They didn’t get out in time to cross a sea, walk a continent, or beg for bread.  There is no better circumstance to breed terrorism than in the place of fear and hopelessness.  I hope we can realize this and start a new way – a human way. Not the “Me First” way.

I have watched the desparate social media pleas for help, and I am helpless.

 

Day 17 Istanbul

n_84227_1

Istanbul is a magnificent city that has seen the rise and fall of civilizations for 3000 years.  It was called Lygos when inhabited by Thracian tribes between the 13th and 11th centuries BC. It was colonised by the Greeks in the 7th century BC.  When the city  fell to the Roman Republic in AD 196 it was named Byzantium.  In 330 AD it was renamed Constantinople and made the new capital of the Roman Empire.  It is the birthplace  of the Greek Orthodox Church. In 1453 Constantinople then became the capital of the Ottoman Empire.

Its inhabitants have worshipped the plural gods of antiquity, The God of Christ, and The God of Mohammed.  Roman bricks still line boulevards, and spice is still sold in baskets the markets.  Laws and leaders have been shaped here. Byzantine emperor Justinian (527-565) extended the Byzantine Empire to its largest boundaries spreading from Palestine to the tip of Spain. He built the Hagia Sophia church and the organized law system called the Codex which was completed in 534.  Emperor Constantine reinvented the city as a thriving center of Christianity. On 29 May 1453, Sultan Mehmed II “the Conqueror”, entered Constantinople after a 53–day siege during which his cannon had torn a huge hole in the Walls of Theodosius II. Istanbul became the third capital of the Ottoman Empire.

After the First World War, the Armistice of Mudros decreed that Istanbul would be occupied by Allied Forces. Occupation of Constantinople by Allied forces ended on 23 September 1923.  Six days later the Republic of Turkey was founded by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

Since 2002, the right-wing Justice and Development Party (AKP) has won pluralities in every general and local election. The current leader is Turkish President and former AKP Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.  In the Machiavellian style of the emperors and sultans before him, he is eliminating his opposition.  Kurds, DAISCH, and other groups are speaking through violence.  Last year they targeted Istanbul Atatürk, the eighteenth-busiest in the world.

I last went to Istanbul to depose a key Iraqi witness in a case.   Albert, the witness, bravely boarded an airplane for the first time in his life to fly away from his family and to give testimony about the abuses of an U.S. contractor.  He boarded he plane in Irbil, Iraq, and landed at Ataturk in the dark.  He had to fly at night so his plane would be less likely to be shot down.  And he did this all with faith in a stranger a million miles away to help right wrongs.

We brought Albert to the hotel where he would be deposed.  Albert thought that the minibar stash was a gift, and he took lots of bottles home to Irbil as the fridge was replenished mysteriously by maids every day.  He wandered Istanbul for a day and brought presents for his wife and daughters.  His eyes were alive with the thought of what it would be like to live in peace and safety for his family.  After the case was long over Albert and his family were able to make it to the U.S. where they now live in Detroit.

The Bosphorus River runs through the city, and it is a deep blue.  Walking along Roman roads, the smell of roasting lamb, diesel, and spice takes the mind back to a place and time it knows, but has never been.

Orhan Pamuk wrote Snow. This story follows Ka, an expatriate Turkish poet, as he wanders around the snowy city and gets caught up in the muddle of aimless Islamists, MPs, headscarf advocates, secularists, and a number of factions who die and kill in the name of highly contradictory ideals. Pamuk said:

I strongly feel that the art of the novel is based on the human capacity, though it’s a limited capacity, to be able to identify with “the other.” Only human beings can do this. It requires imagination, a sort of morality, a self-imposed goal of understanding this person who is different from us, which is a rarity.

Among the markets old and new, the seven lane highways, and the political violence, a spirit of  Rumi and his Sufi order  who whirl to remember God.  Reading Rumi shows us that ideas are universal.

Why should I seek? I am the same as
He. His essence speaks through me.
I have been looking for myself

از جمادی مُردم و نامی شدم
وز نما مُردم به حیوان سرزدم
مُردم از حیوانی و آدم شدم
پس چه ترسم؟ کی ز مردن کم شدم؟
حملهٔ دیگر بمیرم از بشر
تا برآرم از ملائک بال و پر
وز ملک هم بایدم جستن ز جو
کل شیء هالک الا وجهه
بار دیگر از ملک پران شوم
آنچه اندر وهم ناید آن شوم
پس عدم گردم عدم چو ارغنون
گویدم کانا الیه راجعون‎
I died as a mineral and became a plant,
I died as plant and rose to animal,
I died as animal and I was Man.
Why should I fear? When was I less by dying?
Yet once more I shall die as Man, to soar
With angels bless’d; but even from angelhood
I must pass on: all except God doth perish.
When I have sacrificed my angel-soul,
I shall become what no mind e’er conceived.
Oh, let me not exist! for Non-existence
Proclaims in organ tones,
To Him we shall return

Thirty-eight people were killed and 136 were wounded on Saturday in two explosions.  One of them was a car bomb outside a stadium that targeted police officers on duty for a soccer game. The second explosion was in a nearby park, and may have been a suicide bomb.

This is the most recent violence, and a continuation of the unrest.   On July 15, 2016 elements of the Turkish armed forces attempted a coup d’état,.  On July 21st, the Turkish government declared a State of Emergency in the country, giving the president and other top leaders extraordinary powers. Now Turkish authorities are carrying out a large-scale purge of people whom they suspect of having felt sympathy for the coup attempt and for allegiance to Fetullah Gülen, the Islamic preacher and business and education entrepreneur.

Gülen teaches a Sunni-Hanafi version of Islam.  Gülen believes in science, interfaith dialogue among the People of the Book, and multi-party democracy. He has initiated dialogue with the Vatican and some Jewish organizations.

Gülen is actively involved in the societal debate concerning the future of the Turkish state, and Islam in the modern world. He has been described as an imam “who promotes a tolerant Islam which emphasises altruism, hard work and education” and as “one of the world’s most important Muslim figures.

At this time Turkey has demanded extradition of Gülen, but the U.S. so far has refused to honor the request.  What will Trump do – align with the purge?  Promote tolerant Islam?  Bridge between religions?

Tolerance and peace are the highest and hardest works of humanity.  The only place to begin is to “identify with ‘the other.’ Only human beings can do this. It requires imagination, a sort of morality, a self-imposed goal of understanding this person who is different from us.”  Today is a good day to start.

 

Day 16 – The Long Walk to Justice: The Sioux

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History is written by the victors – for a while.  Custer was glorified for his grisly campaign and mourned when he died in the hills in northern Wyoming.  But a new consciousness arose when Helen Hunt Jackson wrote A Century of Dishonor and Dee Brown’s 1970  Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee was published. These books gave a voice to the history of American expansionism and the Native Americans’ displacement through forced relocation and effort to destroy the culture, religion, and way of life.

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In the 1968 the American Indian Movement (AIM) was born.Its purpose was to address American Indian sovereignty, treaty issues, spirituality, and leadership, while simultaneously addressing incidents of police harassment and racism.  1969-1971 AIM occupied Alcatraz, and the next year it organized a march on Washington, D.C. “The Trail of Broken Treaties.

 During the 1970’s a 3,200-mile walk known was the “Longest Walk”rallied thousands representing many Indian Nations throughout the United States and Canada. In 1978 the walk entered DC and the elders led the walkers to the Washington Monument where the Pipe that was carried across the nation was smoked.  President Carter  refused to meet with representatives of The Longest Walk.
AIM led the Longest Walk 2, which arrived in Washington in July 2008. This 8,200 mile walk started from the San Francisco Bay area. The Longest Walk 2 had representatives from more than 100 American Indian nations, and other indigenous participants, such as the Maori. The walk highlighted the need for protection of American Indian sacred sites, tribal sovereignty, environmental protection and action to stop global warming.
Leonard Peltier was a member of AIM who was convicted of shooting two FBI agents.  His conviction has been the included in Amnesty International’s “Unfair Trials” list.

 

Wahacanka Peltier, was the youngest child of imprisoned Leonard Peltier.  He has never been able to visit his father outside of a prison.  His  English name was Paul Shields-Peltier. He was born and raised on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.  He lived the very hard life that is life on the Pine Ridge, but in recent years he joined a company that was building environmentally sustainable housing for the people of the reservation and it was something he loved to do because it knew he was helping his people.

 

He died in Washington, D.C. this week.  He was there on a vigil to seek clemency for his father.

 

I learned this news yesterday from my husband who works with an NGO, Trees Water People (TWP), at Pine Ridge.  There is a partnership between the visionary Henry Red Cloud, a man I am honored to know, and TWP.  Henry  Red Cloud founded Lakota Solar and has been a leader and real job creator. Lakota Solar Enterprises   He is the direct 5th generation descendant of Chief Red Cloud, one of the last Lakota war chiefs.

Yesterday with this terrible news, my husband was elected to serve as President of Trees Water People. Trees Water People This NGO works with Lakota Solar and is the reason my husband goes to Pine Ridge.
My husband has been working to raise money to build a house for Wahacanka and his family.    And now, a go fund me campaign exists to help this family.  Paul’s Go Fund Me
I am asking for the support of friends for our friends.

It is with a deeply sad heart that I write this. Today my dear younger brother Wa Ha walked on. He was with us here in Washington DC as we pray and work for clemency for our father Leonard Peltier. He was my little brother and I cannot believe his is gone from us. His name was Wahacanka.

His english name was Paul Shields-Peltier and he was born and raised on the Pine Ridge Oglala Lakota reservation. He had been sick for many months and was having dialysis for four hours a day three days a week and although his wife and family suggested him not to make this trip he would not be turned back. In true Oglala way he said he wanted to go on this journey to help bring his father home.
He adored his wife Emily Two Lance-Peltier and his five children (four daughters and one son) and his mother Audrey Shields, his sisters and brothers and other family members and the Oglala Oyate. He was a quiet man who was known for his soft good humor and kind spirit. He never missed an event or a ceremony for our father. He was never one to stand up and speak but always there to help and support.
He lived the very hard life that is life on the Pine Ridge but in recent years he joined a company that was building environmentally sustainable housing for the people of the reservation and it was something he loved to do because it knew he was helping his people.
He suffered a very damaging stroke while working and has been trying to recover since.

Our dad had wished to donate one of his kidneys to Wa Ha but because of his imprisonment and his own failing health that was not possible. I will never forget my fathers words when he found out. He said, “Oh No. My Son has died. My baby has died.” I wish we could console him now as we try to console each other.

Pine Ridge Indian Reservation encompasses the poorest counties in the United States. It is the site of tragedy; it was the location of the last of the Ghost Dances. The U.S. authorities attempt to repress this movement eventually led to the Wounded Knee Massacre on December 29, 1890.

I learned the rumor that DAPL will continue despite the fact that the Army Corps have denied the permit.  DAPL decided that it would rather pay the fines, or so that it the rumor.   If this is so, the tragic stripping of the rights and properties of the tribes will continue, and may again lead to violence and loss.  The Standing Rock Sioux and millions of people want the 500 years of taking to stop.  Standing Rock Sioux

Since Trump has a stake in DAPL, he stands in a unique place to stop history from repeating itself – killings in the snow – loss of life – loss of identity.  Will he?  Or will he want profits that mean nothing to a billionaire at the expense of land that means everything to people that have endured too much loss for too many centuries.  Soon we will know if his history will categorize him as a Custer, a blonde narcissist who would do anything for notoriety.

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Beth Klein Boulder Attorney Letter15

Feb. 20, 1962, John Glenn became an iconic explorer.  Breaking the trail into space and advancing technology on earth.  He died today.

Millions of people invented materials, electronics, fuels, and a myriad of binary codes to make Glenn’s three trips around the earth possible.  Five hours on Feb. 20, 1962 was a culmination of all of the technological aspirations of humankind.  The Friendship 7 Mission succeeded, and America showed its strength in invention and vision.  He followed and surpassed Yuri A. Gagarin and Gherman S. Titov, Alan B. Shepard and Virgil I. Grissom.

Behind good men, there are always good women. NASA’s “Computers in Skirts”  were mathematics and physics geniuses who calculated the trajectories for space missions and designed software to make the mission go. Katherine Johnson, a 2016 Medal of Freedom recipient, along with her colleagues Dorothy Vaughn and Mary Jackson, served as the brains behind John Glenn  orbit and his safe return.  Margaret H. Hamilton led the team that created the on-board flight software for NASA’s Apollo command modules and lunar modules.

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The contributions of icon John Glenn were watched around the world in 1962 are incalculable.  The quiet support of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, Mary Jackson and Margaret Hamilton are also ticker tape worthy.  Bill Gates and Steve Jobs stand on their shoulders.   Mark Zuckerberg and the billions of FB’ers owe them all thanks.

The humanity, mastery and heroism of John Glenn are clear when we read his words:

“Zero G and I feel fine.”

“As I hurtled through space, one thought kept crossing my mind — every part of this rocket was supplied by the lowest bidder.”

“To sit back and let fate play its hand out and never influence it is not the way man was meant to operate.”

“I don’t know what you could say about a day in which you have seen four beautiful sunsets.

“If there is one thing I’ve learned in my years on this planet, it’s that the happiest and most fulfilled people I’ve known are those who devoted themselves to something bigger and more profound than merely their own self-interest.”

The words a leader uses, seals his reputation for the ages.  Words make worlds, and as communication technology develops,  words spread faster, and accuracy and clarity matter.

FDR’s radio fireside chats are eternal.  His words bring people together.

“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

TV amplified John Kennedy’s  words as he encouraged America to aim for the stars.

And so, my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country.

Forgive your enemies, but never forget their names.

Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.

Mankind must put an end to war before war puts an end to mankind.

Obama, a master public speaker, moved enormous crowds.  He used the Whitehouse Webcam, Facebook, and Social Media to communicate.

“Yes we can.”

Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.

And now 140 characters is the cutting edge in Presidential communication.  It has not been inspirational.  How can Americans come together in a universe of divided news, smart phones, feeds, and fake news?  We hear only what conforms to our world view.

Who inspires us now and says the words that are worthy of the ages?  Where are Atticus Finch and Churchill?  Or do we live in the cynical  age of the celebrity and the Heisenberg multi-dimensional villain?

But then, I am reminded “never, never, never give up.”  Glenn failed many times, but he never quit.  In 1964, Glenn entered the Ohio Democratic primary running against incumbent Senator Stephen Young, however, an accident forced Glenn to leave the race.  In 1970 he ran for Senate again and lost.  On the third try in 1974, he won his Senate race.   It took a decade of failing and trying.  He tried to become President of the United States, and he failed.  But he became the oldest human to venture into space. He never quit.

There is a lesson for all of us in Glenn’s well-lived life.  It takes time, tries, and failures to make vision into reality.  And it takes the support of others.    It takes words that inspire and bring people together in common goals.

We never will succeed in any mission alone.  We must have  a common vision and the courage to set aside differences so that we can work to a greater end – – for many other than ourselves.  And we need the words that inspire and are worth remembering.